Categories
Minister Prayers

Jacob: 2 August 2020

I’ve often found borders to be interesting places. Sometimes they are markers. Whenever we head north, getting over the border is a time to pause ready for the next leg of the journey. There was a time when we would cheer or boo depending on the direction of travel! The landscape doesn’t change significantly, and yet there can be a different atmosphere and language. At the moment borders are being used to control or define the management of Covid-19. We are now allowed to go north and cross that border, some are heading west to cross that border, and those coming from Spain have to pause 14 days. But we can not yet visit our son in Leicester. 

Our Bible reading this week is set at a border crossing. A few weeks ago I was listening to the experience of people who visited Palestine as part of a URC visit. They found the  checkpoints to be a means of control and oppression, and Bethlehem, so beloved in our Christmas narrative is suffering because of it. At the same time I was writing a prayer for a Synod pamphlet that will be published later in the year, so this was the prayer I submitted.

Skip with the Peacemakers

May we play hopscotch at checkpoints,

chanting ancient skipping rhymes.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn around.

 

May we patch daisies onto khaki pockets,

cultivating landing strips with seed-bombs.

Say a prayer, say a prayer, touch the ground.

 

May we dance freestyle at the border

sharing welcome howls of laughter.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, jump up high.

 

May we throw petals at broken fences

widening pathways for hand-crafters.

Say a prayer, say a prayer, bless our cry.

 

May we stroll through deserted camps

picking over well worn pointless phrases.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, bend down low.

 

May we spray arrows of hope and awe,

spinning rainbow yarns of tenderness.

Say a prayer, say a prayer, peace may grow.

Prayers & Reflection for 2 August 2020

Prayer

The Lord is gracious and compassionate,

slow to anger and rich in love

The Lord is good to all,

with compassion on all that has been made.

Psalm 145: 8-9,

Hymn

Take this moment, sign, and space

take my friends around

here among us make the place

where your love is found.

 

Take the time to call my name,

take the time to mend

who I am and what I’ve been

all I’ve failed to tend.

Bible Genesis 32:22-31. 

Reflection

We have moved forward some 20 years. Leah, Rachel, Jacob and their family have prospered. Jacob’s management of the flock, his ability to breed spotted or speckled sheep and goats and to ensure that the strongest animals became part of his flock have served them well. But of course this has also bred resentment from Laban and his sons, and so together they decide it’s time to leave and head to Canaan. We meet them again at the border, there is no way back and yet ahead of them is Esau. Does he still resent Jacob for stealing his blessing? Jacob sends forward peace offerings, then his wives, maidservants and children and spends the night alone. 

Perhaps this is the first time he has been alone since he fled from Esau, and once again in this solitude, filled with fear and uncertainty, he experiences God. This encounter is far more visceral than the first. There is no encouraging vision, instead they wrestle through the night, matching one another in power and ferocity. At daybreak  Jacob demands a blessing before he will let this wrestler go. The blessing is forthcoming, but with it comes a new name and permanent limp. Jacob is now Israel, one who has striven with God and with humans, and has prevailed.

There are moments in any lifetime that are a struggle. Often the way in which we respond to those struggles will determine how we feel about such times. We live in a moment where the consequences of 500 years of profiteering are being confronted. Whether it is the legacy of slavery, nation building, or climate catastrophe it feels like we are standing on a border, struggling with our past and striving with alternative visions for the future direction of humanity. Such places will never feel easy, but we also know that Jesus has crossed these borders before us, given us the talents and skills to share with one another. God trusts us to strive for communities filled with peace and justice. May we know the name we have been given, the scars we carry and the blessings of God’s abundant love. 

Prayer

The Lord upholds all who fall

and lifts up all who are bowed down.

The eyes of all look to you

and you give them their food at the proper time.

You open your hand and satisfy the desires of every living thing.

Psalm 145:14-16

Hymn

Take my talents and my skills

take what’s yet to be;

let my life be yours, and yet

let it still be me.

John Bell (b1949) & Graham Maule (1958-2020)

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Minister Prayers

Leah & Rachel: 26 July 2020

I’m writing this whilst we watch a programme about Paramedics during Covid-19. It highlights the difficulties faced by people who have had to continue working through the lockdown. They have been under pressure, worried for their own health and the health of their own families whilst caring for the whole community. I can also see the thrill of it, and with the work I have done I understand that sense of wanting to be at the heart of things. I think that is what I have found strangest about the last few months. We had to close down our work at St. Columba’s which had allowed me to be at the centre of community action. Instead, I’ve been working away at home and aware that I’ve been out of touch with much of what is happening in large parts of the community. It doesn’t look like we will be able to continue work at St. Columba’s again, and we still wait to see if we begin new work at Ball Hill and how we can shape life at Ansty Road once we return to the building. So even as others are getting back to work, I’m still feeling disorientated and struggling to know what plans to make for now and the future.

I’m aware that similar changes are happening for some of you. Things that have been at the heart of your life have already been lost. Some of you are caring for people who are very ill, or dealing with illness yourselves. Even if you are beginning to meet up with family and friends again, it’s under different circumstances, with restrictions in place and uncertainty about every plan made. 

Please look out for one another, give people a ring, join us in praying for one another and for our world. We have all been affected by this time, and the long term impact will not be known for a long time.

The funeral of Eddie Jones will be next Wednesday (29th). Obviously we can not make the general invitation that we would normally do, so please pray for his family. It will be the first funeral I have taken through this period – so another new experience.

 

Prayer

Eternal God, you are with us this day in the fullness of your love.

In the love of one for another we see your will for all creation

In the tenderness of love’s embrace we remember your love once made flesh for us.

Hymn

Put peace into each other’s hands

and like a treasure hold it,

protect it like a candle flame,

with tenderness fold it.

 

Put peace into each other’s hands

with loving expectation;

be gentle in your words and ways,

in touch with God’s creation.

Bible Genesis 29:15-28 

Reflection Jacob has arrived at Haran, and we have once again been to the well so that he can check out the local women. He meets his cousin Rachel and is instantly smitten. This passage picks up the story whilst he is living in Laban’s house and we could focus on these two tricksters trying to outsmart one another, but let’s ignore them for a while and look to the sisters Leah and Rachel. From the encounter at the well we know that Rachel works with her father’s sheep and is welcoming to this stranger. But now we see them described by their looks, the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. Leah’s eyes were lovely, and Rachel was graceful and beautiful. (NRSV). In other translations Leah’s eyes are weak, didn’t sparkle, nice, tender and Rachel has a good figure, stunning, well favoured. As the story goes on their relationship will be defined by the children they produce. Is this really the only way a woman has value? 

We also see the nature of biblical marriage. One man married to two sisters, later with their handmaidens providing surrogate children. It’s very different to our idea of conventional marriage. Yet it is consistent. Throughout the Bible and Christian history the people of God have followed the customs and traditions of their culture. Sometimes there are adjustments, and always, an expectation of faithfulness within those customs. But, our concepts of marriage are constantly shifting and many will have seen that within their own lifetimes. Leah and Rachel, Zilpah and Bilhah will eventually create a new family together. There will be tensions between them rivalry and jealousy will be ever present. But so is co-operation, the expectation of providence and the following of God’s call. 

God calls us into a new family. Sometimes it’s a strange family with difficult relationships  and challenging behaviour. But at our best we can care for one another, we can welcome new people into the family, we can adapt to new environments and we continue to be faithful to God’s call. It’s a lovely place to be.

Prayer

May God who is light shine in your darkness

May God who is love be the love between you.

May God who is life be your life everlasting.

Hymn

As at communion, shape your hands

into a waiting cradle;

the gift of Christ receive, revere,

hunted round the table.

 

Put Christ into each other’s hands,

he is love deepest measure;

in love make peace, give peace a chance

and share it like a treasure.

Fred Kaan (1929- 2009)

Categories
Minister Prayers

Jacob: 19 July 2020

I’m not sure what to do with myself at the moment. Whilst others are either back in church or planning for September our situations at both churches mean that we won’t be making those plans until at least September. In addition, whilst many are meeting up with more and more people, I’m still being careful, Chris has been at school and I have regularly been at Ansty Road mixing with the builders, where there is some social distancing, but sometimes it can be a bit lax. So I’m wary of mixing with others too widely. 

We would normally mark this time of year with a general invitation to our Garden for afternoon tea. But the rules on such things are awkward, so we will look at how we might be able to do that – but I know from other conversations that many of you are also uncertain, so please forgive us if that also proves too hard to do. I do hope however that Chris and I can manage some day trips somewhere. We are also still planning a holiday at the end of August, but the festivals we go to have all been cancelled, so even the summer doesn’t give us treats to look forward to. 

Which all sounds very down beat. Below, I share a blessing and write about the blessings that God promises. However down beat I’m feeling, I do know that I have been blessed in the life I have been able to live, the people around me and the work God has called me to. I do know the many privileges that my life gives me, so I won’t be grumbling for too long – sometimes we just need to have a moment!

 

Prayer

The Lord bless you and keep you

The Lord make his face to shine upon you

and be gracious unto you.

Hymn

Morning glory, starlit sky

sorting music, scholars truth,

flight of swallows, autumn leaves,

memory’s treasure, grace of youth.

 

open are the gifts of God

gifts of love to mind and sense

hidden is love’s agony

love’s endeavour, love’s expense.

Bible Genesis 28:10-22. 

Reflection The lectionary has jumped forward, so you might also like to read Genesis 27:1 – 28:9. We focus on Jacob, alone and afraid. Some might say it is his own fault. He has broken trust with his father and brother, he has refused to engage with the wider community, his trickiness has found him out and he is banished. It is now, at this low point, that he begins to be aware of God’s presence with him. Not just God, but the angels are coming to him, opening up the space between heaven and earth, finding Jacob in despair and preparing him to hear God’s word. 

When God speaks, it is with three important messages. 

I am with you.

I will keep you. 

You will be a blessing.

I am with you, will become the promise of Jesus – Emmanuel, God with us; the last word in Matthew’s gospel, “I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” I will keep you, will be a recurrent theme, The Lord bless you and keep you (Num 6:24-26). You will be a blessing – will be the good news that Jesus proclaims, “Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Matt 5:1-10). 

On Tuesday I was at two conferences. The first asked, “Do black lives matter in the URC?” The second reflected on a URC visit to Palestine in 2019. In both, I was left reflecting on the way we are cursed by human conflict and our need to dominate one another leaves everyone brutalised and frightened. Jacob still has much wrestling to do, but he does so knowing that God is with him, keeps him and blesses him and his descendants. May we also know that for ourselves. 

Prayer

May you know God’s presence always with you

May you know God’s protection keeping you safe

May you know God’s promise blessing your days.

Hymn

Therefore he who shows us God

helpless hangs upon the tree;

and the nails and crown of thorns

tell us what God’s love must be.

 

Here is God, no monarch he.

throned in easy state to reign

here is God, whose arms of love

aching, spent, the world sustain

W H Vanstone (1923-99)

Categories
Minister Prayers

Esau & Jacob: 12 July 2020

May I start this week with a poem?

Striding

Three boys, brothers 

by their gaze and gait;

the taller two steps 

ahead. The smaller 

messing with stuffed

pockets half runs 

to keep up.

 

Did we walk that way?

Me strutting ahead

embarrassed by your

childishness, playing

it cool, almost a man.

 

We walk together now,

measured pace.

Three men, brothers. 

Craig Muir, 2019

This poem came to mind because this Sunday we look at the brothers Esau and Jacob. Our sibling relationships can often be difficult. We know the buttons to press and have been doing it for a lifetime. The three of us have certainly had our moments, but at this time we use our differing abilities to manage the care of our parents, supporting each other and the wider family. 

We sometimes think of church as a family. We know how to discomfort one another, yet can also be incredibly supportive and encouraging. We are living in times where we need to learn new things from one another. People we have relied upon are having to rethink their availability and the rhythm of life. We are looking for new generations to emerge and help, and this is a time when different gifts and skills are required, so may we learn how to walk together, measured pace. And talking of learning, I’m told that the numbers below are too small for some, so …..

Our midweek fellowship at 7pm on Thursday will be a time of prayer using the same link as we use each Sunday.

Prayer

Your word is a lamp giving light where we walk.

Your laws are fair-minded, we give you our word.

Accept these offerings, teach us your ways

Hear our pain, lighten our load

 

Hymn

Great is thy faithfulness, O God my Father

there is no shadow of turning with thee

thou changest not, thy compassions, they fail not

as thou hast been thou for ever wilt be.

Great is thy faithfulness, great is thy faithfulness

morning by morning, new mercies I see:

all I have needed thy hand hath provided

great is thy faithfulness, Lord unto me.

Bible Genesis 25:19-34

Reflection

Abraham has exited and we turn to a new generation. But, the focus quickly moves past Isaac, and onto his sons Esau and Jacob. Like other biblical births, they arrive when God is ready as an answer to prayer and as a story of struggle. It is the struggle of siblings for attention, prominence, inheritance. It is the striving of nations to be stronger than the other, to shape their own destiny. Sets fast food against slow cooking, instant gratification against the long game. It challenges notions of entitled inheritance and asks questions about the birthright anyone is able to claim.

Competition seems to be ingrained. It can be expressed through sport, comparing houses, salaries or status. Do we naturally support the winners or the underdog? Do we admire Esau’s brute strength, the rugged outdoors type or Jacob’s quickness of mind? Are our competitive instincts wetted by SkySports or Bake Off?  Sometimes such rivalry has produced great achievements, yet in others we can see centuries of enmity. We know the benefits of worldwide co-operation, yet still the mantra is to be world-beating. 

Jacob inherits the promise made to his grandparents. But he will not acquire that promise by birthright, or by his own skill or because he is stronger, wiser, greater than anyone else. He will be a child of promise because he is chosen by God. He is not chosen for his obvious good qualities, indeed some might look at Jacob and wonder if he has any good qualities. Yet, there is a faithfulness, a precariousness about him, that will trust in God. He has some freedom to live life as he chooses, and yet freedom is bounded by choices God has made on Jacob’s behalf. Just as the choices we can make are restricted by so many factors, including the call God makes upon us. Here, at the beginning of this story we see Jacob and Esau in conflict with their birthrights.  

Prayer

Garland us with hope, 

Hold us with love

Catch us with joy

Turn us to your course 

Hymn

Pardon for sin and a peace that endureth,

thine own dear presence to cheer and to guide;

strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow,

blessings all mine, with ten thousand beside. 

Great is thy faithfulness, great is thy faithfulness

morning by morning, new mercies I see:

all I have needed thy hand hath provided

great is thy faithfulness, Lord unto me.

T G Chisolm (1866-1960)

Categories
Minister News Prayers

14 June 2020

It is now almost three months since we were able to meet together in our church buildings and whilst various activities are opening up, the advice from the United Reformed Church is to be in no rush to open. Our style of church believes that private prayer happens in the home, or street or park, we only need buildings to gather together or reach out from. Even if the government advice is that we can gather in the building, we are still going to be cautious. The Elders believe that too many of our normal congregation will still need to be shielded and that the precautions we would need to put in place would make our already small congregation even smaller.

So far, we have encouraged you to use the material on the reverse of this page, along with television, radio and internet resources in order to worship on a Sunday morning. We have produced some podcasts and have gathered online for a bible study. Elsewhere, I have learnt how to use a conference facility called Zoom. It can be accessed by computers or telephones and allows us to see and hear those who use computers, whilst those on the telephone can hear and talk. I have hosted services for Chapel of Unity, sat in on a service with North Warwickshire Group, as well as sitting in lots of meetings from the comfort of my own chair.

At both Elders’ meeting this week it was felt that the time had come to use zoom to create a space where we could be with one another on a Sunday morning and so from this Sunday we are going to offer an online service each week. I will continue to send you a weekly outline for those who do not wish to join with us or find the technology too difficult. But I would also say that many people have been surprised at how easy it is to use – so please give it a go.

To join by phone dial one of the following numbers

0131 460 1196

0203 051 2874

0203 481 5237

0203 481 5240

If you have problems try another number. When asked to enter your Meeting ID key in 831 4268 9496#-  if asked for a Participant key just dial #. If asked for a password it is 512001 

To join by computer,  click on this link  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83142689496

and say yes to the various questions. (It gets easier the second time). 

Meeting ID: 831 4268 9496       Password: 512001

Please come and join us, we will all be learning as we go.

On other matters. The work on the church building has begun. I know some of you have been past for a peek. There have been a couple of surprises once the builders were able to uncover previous work and that has caused a bit of adjustment, but I hope we have found the right solutions. If you are able to support the work financially then that would be helpful. The budget is tight and the more leeway we have the better. So far the grant applications have not been successful. If you can, please send your contributions to Caroline, preferable by a direct payment into our Barclays account Sort Code 202355 Account No 60995746. We also need to meet ongoing costs. We believe we can do that as we have a reasonable reserve but of course all contributions help to sustain that confidence. 

Sorry to end with the begging bit – keep going and I hope you find something much more nourishing.

 

Prayer Powerful God, you strengthen us, no matter what storms we face in this life. We give you the glory!

United Church of Christ, Daily Devotional 10 June 2020

Hymn

Here in this place, new light is streaming 

now is the darkness vanished away, 

see, in this space, our fears and our dreamings, 

brought here to you in the light of this day. 

Gather us in the lost and forsaken 

gather us in the blind and the lame; 

call to us now, and we shall awaken 

we shall arise at the sound of our name. 

Bible Genesis 18:1-15

Reflection Let me bring a little bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on—since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.”

Is this a God-incidence? Kirsty is in the process of finalising the details of renting a shop on Ball Hill so that we can start the work there that some of us have been talking about for many years. And I asked, what are we going to call it? What name do we put above the door? As is my want, I then began throwing out suggestions. Amongst the things I played with, was the current address – 185 Walsgrave Road – what if we called it 1/85 or 18:5? I began looking at bible passages that fitted, there are lots of them for 18:5 – and one is the verse above. It comes in the midst of this passage about creating hospitality. God’s self as three strangers is welcomed into the camp. This is what we want to do at our [Unnamed] shop – welcome, refresh, pass on, serve. 

Having dashed something off to Kirsty, I turned to thinking about this Sunday and looked up the lectionary readings. Here we were again, Genesis 18:5. Abraham knowing he has to welcome these strangers – however in the next verse he is mansplaining to Sarah, how to make cakes (Whoops) and then rushing off to instruct servants on picking out some meat to serve. Eventually, he settles down and he has time to hear the message, “Sarah will have a son.” Sadly, Sarah hears this by listening from the tent, but her mocking laughter is noted and her son Issac (He laughs) will be named for that moment.  

For some of us, this has been a busy time. Sometimes it’s been difficult to take time to sit down and listen to God. And yet when I do it is all about the future and some plans seem ridiculous enough to create mocking laughter. Next week Kirsty and I will be at online Ministers Summer School, instead of meeting at Swanwick. There is no planned content in the afternoons and we are being encouraged to rest and reflect. Makes you laugh!

Prayer God, you disrupt our calm. Continue to be our peace. Amen.                                         United Church of Christ, Daily Devotional 8 June 2020

Hymn

Not in the dark of buildings confining 

not in some heaven, light years away 

but here in this place, the new light is shining 

now is the kingdom, now is the day. 

Gather us in and hold us forever 

gather us in and make us your own 

gather us in all peoples together 

fire of love in our flesh and our bone.

Marty Haughen © Gregorian Institute of America

Categories
Minister Prayers Walking the Way

7 June 2020

I wrote last week about beginning a series of Prayer walks, so I thought I would share something from those. Monday was Ansty Road, beginning outside the church where I could inspect the early work on the redevelopment, trenches a dug for the footings, there is a big hole where the steps used to be and all the muck from broken drains has been cleared out. Inside some of the walls have been removed. Already a different view into the building is emerging. That, for me, is the purpose of a prayer walk, not just to pray but to have a new view emerge.

Ansty Road is shorter than I thought, I had to consciously slow myself down. I noticed various building projects in progress, the closed pubs/club and the taste of pollution beginning again as the roads become busier. We wondered if the climate might get an extended break, but it seems not. There were various other people walking as well, most looked as if they were exercising, most keen to nod hello, whilst maintaining distance but each engagement remembering the joy of being amongst people. 

Around St. Columba’s, it’s quieter. Drapers Field isn’t being used to park for the City Centre and there is very little movement. Along the canal, the ducks were negotiating a collection of lilies, cans and bottles. There is still no rest for our environment. Along Widdrington Road and Aldbourne Road cars are parked tightly, seemingly with nowhere to go. I’m reminded that I wanted to focus on environmental concerns through this period, but have been distracted, The climate crisis will not go away and will not do so if we return to business as usual.    

On Monday of this week  we will pray on Hocking Road, Farren Road, Oldham Ave, Hyde Rd, Edyth Rd, Belgrave Road, Arch Road.

On Tuesday, St. Columba’s Close, St. Nicholas Street, Ellys Road, Sandy Lane, Somerset Road, Dorset Road, Kingfield Road, Pridmore Road, Foleshill Road.

Please join in however you can.

Some of you have been kind enough to ask after my parents. They have both been ill with Covid-19, as have many others in their care home. They have both recovered from it, but are a bit weaker and a bit more confused than they were before. Thank you for the prayers and messages of support, it has been particularly difficult when we have been unable to visit and wonder what news each phone call will bring.

Sunday 7 June   Trinity Sunday

Prayer In the name of God we come to worship

As followers of Jesus we come to worship

Welcomed by the Spirit we come to worship

Hymn Eternal God, your loves tremendous glory

cascades through life in overflowing grace,

to tell creation’s meaning in the story

of love evolving love from time and space.

Bible 2 Corinthians 13:5-14

Reflection I watch the news from the United States with a heavy heart. The ease and arrogance with which a Police Officer killed a man whilst the public watched. The threat to violence from the President enacted with ruthless efficiency and then protesters being cleared from the White House with tear gas so that the President can strut across the road and hold a bible up outside a church. And then sometimes I’m heartened by peoples humanity -, the images of many peaceful demonstrations and the voices of speakers such as William Barber II (https://www.facebook.com/anewppc/videos/268796894477061/)  and Traci Blackmon (https://youtu.be/QwpjH2ZkdSI)  But mostly I’m appalled.

And I’m worried. We might sit here and say, “Look at them over there” but I know that many of our communities feel similarly marginalised and discriminated against, and you wonder what spark might set off similar scenes and whether a government that likes it’s militaristic language, may respond with similar aggression. It seems so far away, and yet so close.

On Trinity Sunday we focus on the oneness of God, whether presented as Creator, Son or Spirit. We remember that relationships are complex and many faceted and yet we are called to be one body. Whenever Paul writes to the Corinthians he knows that divisions are not far from the surface and so he challenges them, “Examine yourselves to see whether you are living in the faith” and then he encourages them, “Put things in order, listen to my appeal, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss.” None of those strike me as passive responses. If we care about the things we see on the news, then we need to be active in examining ourselves, listening to others, finding agreement, creating peace, dwelling with love, greeting with a kiss.

Prayer

We seek blessing upon your church

that we may be one as you are one

that we may follow the path you lead 

that we reveal your glory

May your Spirit rest upon each one. 

Hymn

Love’s trinity, self-perfect, self-sustaining;

love which commands, enables and obeys:

you give yourself, in boundless joy, creating 

one vast increasing harmony of praise. 

Alan Gaunt Rejoice & Sing 33

© Stainer & Bell Ltd

Categories
Minister Prayers Walking the Way

30 May 2020 – Pentecost

On Sunday we will arrive at Pentecost. It is the Sunday that remembers and celebrates the birthday of the church – when (according to Luke) the Holy Spirit arrived 50 days after Easter and gave the disciples enough courage in their hearts and fire on their tongues to emerge from the upper room where they had been hiding and to proclaim the good news that Christ was risen and the world had changed.

This Pentecost may feel similar to us. We are being encouraged to venture out from home a bit more, to gather with a few more people but still to take care. More businesses are being encouraged to open to the public and we wait to see just how effective that will be and whether this will allow us to live with this virus or whether it will all be too much. But, even with restrictions gradually lifting, we are not yet allowed or being encouraged to open church building. However, the delight is that all across the country the church has proved itself open for business in a variety of new (and old but slightly adapted) ways. Long may we continue to speak God’s word in new ways.

As I explained last week I’m going to spend this month engaged in old customs (slightly adapted for modern times) by walking our streets in prayer. I hope those of you who are allowed out and are active will do the same. You can plan your own prayer routes and make your own commitments to walk a particular area. The way to do so is to go to https://www.openheavencoventry.org/the-app, register, and mark the roads that you wish to pray for. When you have done so you go back and click on it to say that you have prayed for those roads and pick some more. If you find that there are no streets to pray for in the area you can access, then go and walk them anyway and pray for them again.

My plan this Monday, (1st June) is to start from Ansty Road church about 10am, walk to the Forum, cross the road and walk back up the hill all the way to B&M’s, cross back over towards the westbound side and walk back to the church. I think it will take a couple of hours, but you might want to send some time following the route on a map and somewhere along it we will have prayed together, I am aware that some who are housebound have committed to joining me in this way.

On Tuesday, I will start from St. Columba’s about 10:30am and go into Drapers Field, and then along the canal to Electric Wharf and back along Sandy Lane. It’s not quite so far, but I have a meeting before and after. Join me where you can.

Prayer

May God’s Spirit dance in our hearts, sing from our mouths and rest in our minds. May God’s Spirit fill our souls with joy.

Hymn

She sits like a bird, brooding on the waters,

hovering on the chaos of the worlds first day;

she sighs and she sings, mothering creation,

waiting to give birth to all the Word can say

Bible Acts 2:1-4

Reflection

I love words (you might have noticed) –  the sound, the feel on my mouth, the way they can surprise, shock and be misheard. The way they take you somewhere else altogether. I love to know their meaning – I discovered this week that the Greek word we translate as hospitality is philoxenia – literally “love of strangers”. It is the exact opposite of xenophobia. Wow, that puts a different perspective on how/who/when we give hospitality. I love how words can convey solid ideas and wild imagination. The way they bring me up short, inspire me forwards or make me think again about which words to share.

Of course words can be dangerous things – when they are twisted, slanted, weaselled; when they conspire to create lies and half-truths; when we are reminded that some words are never kept. Sadly, my words are on the whole English. I have a splattering of other languages, but I’ve never been adept at retaining them and have forgotten almost as much as I’ve ever learnt. Even when I think I know another language, I go blank when I have to use it and sigh with relief when I can revert to English – a Scots/Mancunian English that conveys harsh consonants, short to the point vowels and the lilt we called home.

When the disciples emerged into the Jerusalem streets, their listeners heard their mother tongue, the dialect that had been whispered in their ears as infants, the sounds they had learnt on their home streets. They know the nuances, inflections, intimacies and they understand this brogue in a way that they could never quite understand the language of empire and oppression that was supposed to bind them together, but in truth whispered lies.

On this Pentecost, we hear the Holy Spirit in our own tongue. We hear God’s truth become embedded in our hearts, we see the excitement of people hearing good news for the very first time, we share the passion of those being confronted by grace once again. In his commentary on Acts, Willie Jennings calls these verses “The Sound of Intimacy”. What a wonderful way to become aware of God’s Spirit alive in peoples lives.

Prayer

May God’s Love bring us together

May Christ’s peace be shared with all people

May the Holy Spirit blend our voices in one healing breath.

 

Hymn

She dances in fire, one with God in essence,

waking tongues of ecstasy where dumbness reigned;

she weans and inspires all whose hearts are open,

nor can she be captured, silenced or restrained.

John Bell & Graham Maule

© WGWG. The Iona Community

Categories
Minister Mission Podcasts Prayers

Praying with Questions

Our final podcast of this Easter to Pentecost series finds us playing with questions and responding in prayer. We hope you have found them useful, we will return if we feel we have something to say.

Credits: Music – “Spirit of God” © Ray Stanyon

Categories
Minister Podcasts Prayers Walking the Way

Pausing for Breath

The fifth in our series of conversations explores our response to John 17 and the prayer of Jesus for all who would walk the way of Jesus.

Categories
Minister News Prayers Walking the Way

Sunday 24 May  Sixth Sunday after Easter

I wrote last week about the way in which this time has created a new routine in the way I work. But routines can’t last for ever and already it’s time to change to a new pattern. Throughout June we are going to join with churches across the city in praying for Coventry. This is going to be done by walking every street whilst we pray. When this was planned we had no idea that it would coincide with a time when we have been unable to go out unless absolutely necessary, and just at the moment when those who can are emerging to look around a world that feels very different to the one we knew in March. Yet, it is still a time when we are unable to open our church buildings – so how apt that before we can imagine going back into our buildings we must walk through our communities and pray for them. 

So I am going to commit myself to a prayer walk every Monday and Tuesday through June. So there will be no time for Podcasts, or the Bible Study unless something new emerges whilst I walk and pray. I would love you to join me in this enterprise. We could walk as two or three together, but you can also plan your own prayer routes and make your own commitments to to walk a particular area. The way to do so is to go to https://www.openheavencoventry.org/the-app register with it and mark the roads that you wish to pray for, when you have done so you go back and click on it to say that you have prayed for those roads and pick some more. If you find that there are no streets to pray for in the area you can access, then go and walk them anyway and pray for them again. 

But the other way that you can support this is by following the route I give you each Sunday, follow it on a map and pray with me. I will begin on 1st June by walking the whole of Ansty Road and on 2nd June by walking from St. Columba’s and around Drapers Field. Each Monday I will be somewhere around Ansty Road and on Tuesday’s around St. Columba’s. 

But this week, we finish our May routine. On Tuesday will be the final bible study in our 1 Peter series join us at 7pm on Tuesday at  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4043156568. And next Sunday will be our podcast for Pentecost bringing that series to an end. We will return at another time having listened for something new to say. And at Ansty Road another change will begin, on Monday the builders will move in and so whenever we return to church it will be to something new. It means that none of us can go in the building without first checking with the builders. Please do so through me. But also, how exciting, nothing stands still. 

be blessed, 

Craig

 

Prayer May Jesus be glorified through the life of his people. 

May God be glorified through all who know God’s presence in the world

Hymn I heard the voice of Jesus say

‘Come unto me and rest;

lay down, O weary one, lay down

your head upon my breast.’

I came to Jesus as I was,

forlorn and faint and sad;

I found in him a resting place,

and he has made me glad.

Bible John 17:1-11

Reflection This is the prayer of Jesus for disciples who are going to negotiate the world without him. In some ways this is the real Lords Prayer, the one we know by that name was a teaching aid. Here in John, Jesus is commending disciples into God’s care. They know God’s name, that Jesus has come from God. They have been given God’s word and know the truth that comes from God. They will remain in the world and so need God’s protection in order to remain a united community of God’s people. 

This is a prayer for people who are going to be pulled so many ways by so many different demands. The pull of family, religion, and tribe. The complications of work, loyalty and ambition. The love of pride, wealth and status. These are people we recognise, facing similar pressures to those we face and Jesus fears that these fragile disciples will crumble under this pressure and yet also knows what he has trained them for. I can remember when I was first ordained as a minister, so full of expectation and hope, ambition and ideas. Suddenly I was faced with an enormous pastoral situation, a baby was born with severe brain damage and lived just six short days. I found myself with these parents I had only just met, grandparents I met in the lift on the way to the ward and I didn’t know what to say or do or even if I could cope. I didn’t know if my training had equipped me for this situation – but discovered it had. Somehow I ministered to them (and they ministered to me) and we discovered that God had given us just enough resources to live the next day. And every June for the last 22 years we remembered Ella and her short life amongst us. 

Prayer Righteous God, though the world does not know you, we know you, and we know that you have sent Jesus to make you known to us, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for us may be in all people and that Jesus may be in them.’

Hymn I heard the voice of Jesus say

I am this dark world’s light;

look unto me, your morn shall rise

and all your day be bright

I looked to Jesus, and I found

in him my star, my sun;

and in that light of life I’ll walk,

till travelling days are done.

H Bonar (1808-89)